“hunter bike review +hunter bike”

Many veteran mountain bike bowhunters would likely agree that their bike is there most important piece of “gear” behind their bow. The reason is simple – the bike enables you to access prime hunting grounds much more efficiently than by walking. Horses can be used but they require a lot of overhead and hassle in comparison to silently unloading a bike and putting on the miles.

The advantages of fat tire bikes are many. You can ride them over rough or muddy ground, even snow. They are geared for rough terrain and provide good traction and balance. They will ride right over small obstructions such as branches and rocks, obstacles that might trip up a normal mountain bike. These bikes are built to take the beating a hunter will dish out.

The frame’s lowered top tube maximizes stand over clearance and rider comfort, making it easy to mount and dismount. The frame is engineered to ensure an efficient, responsive ride and stable handling, even at low speed.

Hunter Mountain Bike Association will be holding it’s AGM at Awaba mountain bike park on Sunday March 25th. The AGM will be held on a combined DH and XC club day, we will advise the time for the AGM closer to the event. The AGM is important for us all so that we ensure there is an active and effective committee representing the wishes of the Club Members. [ 334 more words ]

But my rationale for going cheap was that I knew from the onset of this project that my bike would be used for one purpose only: hunting. General abuse — crossing creeks and being tossed over barbed-wire fences, hidden in brushpiles and left outside for months at a time — was going to be the rule for this bike; it wouldn’t hang by hooks in the garage for very long.

Originally developed to build on Shimano’s top level component group Dura Ace, the Di2 electronic shifting system changed the roadie game with unmatched speed, accuracy and precision. Now with its third iteration, Di2 makes its debut for internal…

Another of the bike’s virtues: It’s basically devoid of petroleum aromas and other smells associated with internal-combustion vehicles: no gas, oil, coolant or transmission fluid to leave scent trails through the woods. Think of the bike’s tires as rolling rubber hunting boots: If your bike does double duty, its tires can obviously pick up scents from roads and parking lots, but if it’s a dedicated hunting tool, you’re virtually assured scent-free passages.

I started thinking it out. The bike would have to get me around on abandoned roads and pack trails. It didn’t have to be fast but it had to be able to roll over rocks and logs. ALSO it had to be usable as a push-type cargo bike. Let me explain. Hunting is a great activity – it’s not a sport, exactly, it’s serious business – but it involves a lot of hard work. Especially after you kill an animal. An elk, even if you shoot it through the heart, can make one last dash, 25, 50, even 100 yards. It will usually head down hill or into brush. You have to crawl in after it and butcher it on the spot, then you have to get it out of the woods. Not much of a problem with deer, but an elk is the size of a horse. A lot of hunters end up carrying the elk out in pieces, on their backs, a quarter or a half mile. Maybe more.

The base frame is welded or fillet brazed (your choice), heat-treated chrome moly (Columbus Zona or TruTemper Verus) with the same tube sizes as the Vida Loca BMX bikes. Chainstays and seatstays are .75″ x .035″ aircraft grade chrome moly. Cable routing is standard Thursday, triple stops under the top tube, with a top-pull front derailleur.

• Camo Accessory Bag – Holds gear and adds storage options. Conveniently fastens over the back wheel. Waterproof and durable construction stands up to the elements. Requires XL Luggage Rack for installation and proper use. Imported. Camo pattern: DZX™.

There’s nothing quite like the excitement of riding a bike hunting. It’s faster than walking, faster than a horse on flat or downhill grades, and you don’t have to feed it or take care of it between hunting seasons. You get there quietly. You can take more with you. You can use it as a game carrier. And you get some really good exercise. And it’s good fun.

The Pacific Northwest is home to hundreds of thousands of acres of managed forest lands, many of which are owned by private electric hunting bike discounts companies that were founded on the rich timber resources that blanket this region. This fertile land is also prime habitat and home to Roosevelt elk, black bear, Columbian black-tailed deer, cougars, and many other species pursued annually by hunters. State forest lands, BLM & DNR lands, and plain old private lands are intermixed throughout and can be pinpointed on various maps. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is the best resource for determining land ownership, but this information can also be obtained via state/county resources and by calling timber companies, provided you have adequate Lat/Lon or other description data available.

Suddenly, movement to my left broke my concentration. A patch of brown was moving through the trees, leisurely working its way towards me. Within a few minutes, a mature doe had closed the gap between us to within 30 yards of my stand.

Having been around the business of bowhunting for more than 40 years, I have seen some products, ideas and concepts come and go. A lot of them. Some of these things become important parts of bowhunting success for many archers, some find a small niche and move along with the growth of the industry, and, of course, some are relegated to the ash-heap of history.  The ones that survive seem to be products that fill a need.

A tagline from the brand is “We make gear for people looking to hunt, fish and forage in remote places.” Hansi Johnson, a Minnesota cyclist and hunter, happens to be one of them. He recently used the Cogburn bike hunting for ruffed grouse in the north woods of Minnesota.

Good hubs and tires will keep you moving, proper brakes will limit your run-ins with local flora. I like disc brakes, rather than calipers. They don’t take nearly the effort on steep downhills, adjust with a simple twist of a knob, don’t get hot and fade, and don’t make as much noise.

This bike has dual hub motors at 1.000 watts each. each motor is driven individually with its own throttle control. I made this bike when I needed some thing to take hunting on public land where ATVs were not allowed.

Great purchase!! Researched bikes for months and finally dropped the hammer. The All Terrain R750 is the perfect stealthy hunting machine. Eric is easy to talk too and will set you up with the correct bike you need !

The meld of biking and hunting is interesting to us and perhaps timely. Ostensibly, the Cogburn bike is an alternative to an ATV. There’s a movement of a younger demographic of hunters that may find a non-motorized option appealing.

Anyone toying with the idea of getting an e-bike need not look further than the Super 73 from California’s Lithium Cycles, already fully funded on Kickstarter. We took the electric bicycle out on the streets of NYC to test the brand’s product claims…

During an afternoon hunt, I’d followed my customary practice and stashed my bike in some brush. With just a few minutes of daylight left, I saw a coyote approaching over my right shoulder, just trotting along at first. Suddenly it crossed the path that my bike’s doe-urine-anointed tires had rolled down as I rode in. Immediately picking up the olfactory cue, it crouched low to ground and began belly-crawling towards my bike, stopping to sniff each spot of deer scent left by the rubber. It stalked right up to the brushpile, and I believe that it fully expected to see a young doe bedded there.

I love the CB4 and what it means for future tools that allow me to easily hunt from a bike. I hope that means more innovative scabbards, gun racks, frame bags, panniers and trailers designed for hunting.

Finding the balance between functionality, weight and aesthetics is no easy task—especially when it comes to electric bikes. With Biomega’s latest, the Biomega OKO designed in collaboration with Bkarje Ingels’ industrial design firm KiBiSi, all…

Safariland Patrol Bike

Safariland partnered with Kona to create the Patrol police bike. We thought its features would ideally serve the hunter and had it custom-painted brown for better concealment. The basic bike features a Kona Racelight Aluminum 7005 frame, hydraulic disc brakes, RockShox front forks, Shimano 30-speed drivetrain, and a solid rear rack. Best of all, it sports 29-inch wheels for increased off-road capabilities over rough terrain and obstacles.

With a mission of making an electric bike as affordable and fun as gas-powered motorcycles, electric vehicle experts Brammo, Inc. recently partnered with Italy’s S.M.R.E. Engineering to produce four new models with a revolutionary six-speed drivetrain…

“all terrain tricycle parts battery powered hunting vehicles”

• Aluminum Hand Cart – Attaches easily and offers smooth movement over rough terrain. Easily hauls gear, camping equipment, treestands or your trophy out of the backwoods. Made of extremely durable 6061 aluminum alloy. When not hunting, it’s also an excellent tool for moving firewood or bulky items thanks to a handle grab that allows you to use it with or without a Rambo bike. Requires XL Luggage Rack for installation and proper use. Wt. capacity: 300 lbs. Wt: 25 lbs.

I love the CB4 and what it means for future tools that allow me to easily hunt from a bike. I hope that means http://electricbikeprices.com innovative scabbards, gun racks, frame bags, panniers and trailers designed for hunting.

I bought my QK in 2015 and have used it for more that a season now and am very pleased with both the performance of the unit, and the service from the company. It loads into my SUV, and is easy to take in and out and no trailer needed. Carries a load of 400#s with no problem, is quiet, quick, and makes my hunts more enjoyable. At 71yo it allows me to stay in the hunt. The read more…

A tagline from the brand is “We make gear for people looking to hunt, fish and forage in remote places.” Hansi Johnson, a Minnesota cyclist and hunter, happens to be one of them. He recently used the Cogburn bike hunting for ruffed grouse in the north woods of Minnesota.

Over the past few years we’ve immensely enjoyed sharing the backcountry with you, but the time has come for Cogburn to close our doors. We would like to thank you for all of your support, and for sharing your stories and experiences with us. Please know that we will continue to support all in-field products and wish you the best in your pursuit of the outdoors.

Tom Ryle’s passion for bowhunting has fueled adventures spanning the United States, Canada, and South Africa. He is an official measurer for the Pope and Young Club, NMLRA, NW Big Game Inc., and Oregon Shed Hunters.

When you purchase ShippingPass you don’t have to worry about minimum order requirements or shipping distance. No matter how small the order or how far it needs to go, ShippingPass provides unlimited nationwide shipping. If you need to return or exchange an item you can send it back at no cost or take it to your neighborhood store.

State lands are not gated but may not be well marked with signs. But they are open to the public so there’s no issue with hunting them. Timber company lands are usually easy to identify because most access points are gated, and these gates are painted different colors according to the company ownership. That fact isn’t too important because public access is usually permitted with limited regulation, such as no overnight camping, building fires, and the use of motorized vehicles behind the gates.  A key point to note – during the early bow seasons in Washington and Oregon wildfire potential increases and timber companies are quick to restrict all public access until adequate rains soak the forests.  Hefty fines are issued to those who don’t respect these restrictions.

Admittedly, ATVs outperform bikes when it comes to one critical task: getting a deer out of the woods. Sorry, folks, but I’ve tried it all — plastic sleds, bike trailers, you name it — and there’s just no good way to lug dead weight with a bike.

Can you please indicate from the list below which items you would absolutely certainly 100% buy if they were an option (organising merch takes many hours of volunteer time so we want to get an accurate number for real potential purchasers). You can select as many of the options as you would like.

The Huntington Bicycle club is a non-profit club organized to promote safe, enjoyable bike rides and share information on cycling safety, fitness, equipment and maintenance. HBC is a member of the League of American Bicyclists. Read More >

This is the CB4. CB4 is a fatbike, a human powered all-terrain vehicle built to take hunters and anglers far into the backcountry quickly and quietly. Its massive 3.8”-wide tires run at very low pressure to provide flotation and amazing traction over rough or soft terrain.

My elk hunting bike would have to carry the meat for me. I thought about the Vietnam War, and the way the NVA would bring down supplies on bicycles. They loaded the bikes up and pushed them down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. History was gonna repeat itself courtesy of Thursday! I designed the bike so it could carry a set of giant saddlebags. All you had to do was get the meat to the bike, load it up, and push it out.

Great purchase!! Researched bikes for months and finally dropped the hammer. The All Terrain R750 is the perfect stealthy hunting machine. Eric is easy to talk too and will set you up with the correct bike you need !

An alternative to toe-clips is the clipless pedal, which provides even more pedaling efficiency, as the sole of your shoe is actually connected to the pedal. It takes some practice stepping into and twisting out of this pedal, but to maximize your pedal power this is the way to go. There is a drawback to that efficiency.  Hunting boots aren’t adaptable to these pedals.  In other words, you’re packing your boots with you, plus you can’t just ditch that bike to chase down an elk without changing shoes first.  It would be best to try out both types of pedals and see which one best suits your hunting needs.

Getting to remote stands usually requires entering into the woods well before daylight; getting out requires long walks in the dark. Neither scenario makes for a silent passage. Striking a compromise between a quiet approach and a quick advance can be difficult — which is exactly what a mountain bike can offer.

“electric road bike |electric off road”

I bought my QK in 2015 and have used it for more that a season now and am very pleased with both the performance of the unit, and the service from the company. It loads into my SUV, and is easy to take in and out and no trailer needed. Carries a load of 400#s with no problem, is quiet, quick, and makes my hunts more enjoyable. At 71yo it allows me to stay in the hunt. The rack is designed for ease of use, and is easily modified for specialty needs.

The meld of biking and hunting is interesting to us and perhaps timely. Ostensibly, the Cogburn bike is an alternative to an ATV. There’s a movement of a younger demographic of hunters that may find a non-motorized option appealing.

• Extra Battery Pack – Samsung 48V10.4Ah lithium-ion battery delivers up to 19 miles of travel on one charge without pedaling and even more by adding pedaling power. Features a built-in USB port for charging electronic devices.

The CB4 frame has attachment points for 1, 2, or 3 standard water bottle cage mounts, depending on the space available on each frame size (larger frames have more bottle mounts, smaller ones have less). The fork has 2 mid-blade mounts and 2 sets of triple-boss attachment points, one on each leg, for oversize cages on the fork to expand carrying capacity for water, stove fuel, sleeping pads and other gear.

Marketed at bow and rifle hunters, the bike — called the CB4 — has a rack, big tires, and a camouflage frame (RealTree Xtra pattern). A tagline from the brand is: “We make gear for people looking to hunt, fish and forage in remote places.”

I’ve read reviews for this bicycle that are both positive and negative. I ended up purchasing this bike for one main reason; I wanted a camouflage bike. I have yet to meet anyone who has anything similar. A lot of the negative reviews have criticized the components. I’m not a competitive cyclist, just an outdoor enthusiast, so it has met my needs. As my skill level and needs progress, it appears that I can update components as needed. I bought this over a year ago and am still enjoying it, and it wasn’t as difficult as I would have expected to assemble. I was sad to see the company disappear, as I was looking to buy some of their other items, like the bow rack, for the bike. I have the rod locker as well, but have not yet used it. I am thoroughly pleased with this purchase, it is a nice ride at a fair price, and am the only guy in my town with a camo bicycle!!

So the design was coming together in my mind, actually it kind of distracted me from the hunt. The bike would be kind of a super-muttonmaster, a 29-er with fairly relaxed geometry and a long-ish rear center. It would have a strong, solid, welded-on steel rack like the muttonmaster. The bags would be an epic pair of panniers running from the front end of the bike all the way to the end of the rack. The seat, shoved way down into the frame, would help carry the bags. It would have gears and disk brakes. The rear brake had to be especially powerful to hold the loaded bike on downhill runs. And, it would probably run front suspension.

So there were a few things happening last weekend but don’t think for a second that we didn’t notice this little milestone – 3000 Page Likes is brilliant – thanks to everyone that contributes to and supports our humble little Mountain Bike club 😎🤗

During an afternoon hunt, I’d followed my customary practice and stashed my bike in some brush. With just a few minutes of daylight left, I saw a coyote approaching over my right shoulder, just trotting along at first. Suddenly it crossed the path that my bike’s doe-urine-anointed tires had rolled down as I rode in. Immediately picking up the olfactory cue, it crouched low to ground and began belly-crawling towards my bike, stopping to sniff each spot of deer scent left by the rubber. It stalked right up to the brushpile, and I believe that it fully expected to see a young doe bedded there.

I don’t think the camo finish is important and tends to hide the bike when I’m searching for it in the woods. Other guys might like that but I am not really that into it. I have been tying an orange rag to the handlebars to help me out! It does look cool though and gets plenty of comments!

Due to the high number of sales of our bikes to fellow sportsman just like yourself, our bikes are in high demand. Check out our All Terrain Electric Fat Bike listing page to see what’s in stock and what’s on the way. Hopefully we’ll be able to get you out and about and enjoying one of our electric fat bikes and you’ll be able to see for yourself why many of our customers consider this to be the best electric bike for hunting.

• Aluminum Hand Cart – Attaches easily and offers smooth movement over rough terrain. Easily hauls gear, camping equipment, treestands or your trophy out of the backwoods. Made of extremely durable 6061 aluminum alloy. When not hunting, it’s also an excellent tool for moving firewood or bulky items thanks to a handle grab that allows you to use it with or without a Rambo bike. Requires XL Luggage Rack for installation and proper use. Wt. capacity: 300 lbs. Wt: 25 lbs.

I continued the camouflaging process with adhesive vinyl in a popular camo pattern that a local sign company was able to order for me. The same material sometimes used to cover golf carts and panels on vehicles so I knew it would be sturdy. Applying it was more time-consuming than I’d anticipated, but in a few hours, the entire frame and several other parts were completely covered. (One tip: Putting the tape on in small pieces works much better than does trying to cover the whole thing at once. The small pieces blend together so well that everyone who’s seen the bike assumes that it was film-dipped.) The vinyl applied, I finished by breaking the remaining olive drab areas up with flat gray, tan, brown and black spray paint.

2006 Specialized Hardrock Comp hardtail. I don’t like rear suspension because I feel it robs energy that I want transferred to the ground when I pedal. I use conventional toe-clips to accommodate my hunting footwear. The tires are 2.20″ for extra load distribution. I also have TopPeak front fender to keep mud and water out of my face.

(Note: Despite the humour conveyed in the video, this is actually a true report of trail conditions and will be resolved sometime over the weekend – in the meantime you will need to get off and lift over – hopefully a bit more successfully than these lads)

At the same bike shop I also found a cargo rack that mounted over the rear tire. Next came a homemade bow rack consisting of a piece of aluminum tubing, purchased at a hardware store and a set of bow/gun holders designed to mount on an ATV rack or handlebars. To make the bow rack I attached the piece of aluminum tubing crossways at the farthest rearward portion of the cargo rack, using nuts and bolts, and then mounted the ATV bow/gun holder to that. It worked like a charm, and I was soon making it silently to my stand in a third of the time that it’d have taken me to walk.

Originally developed to build on Shimano’s top level component group Dura Ace, the Di2 electronic shifting system changed the roadie game with unmatched speed, accuracy and precision. Now with its third iteration, Di2 makes its debut for internal…

Before I started bowhunting, I had no idea of the joy that hunting unpressured deer brings. Only one other archer was in my hunting club, and those first few weeks before gun season started were truly wonderful.

Covering several hundred yards quickly is a simple affair for a hunter on a bike. Moreover, a bike seems to make less noise — or at least a less recognizable noise — than does someone walking; it certainly makes less noise that an ATV. Of course, if you’re riding in before dawn, you’ll want to have scouted the route before hand.

Of course, a bike simplifies pre-season scouting as well. One of my favorite deer-related activities is a last-minute “speed-scouting” venture undertaken about a week before the season starts. I quickly beat a path across the property, checking cameras, surveying acorn crops, and looking for bucks’ hoof prints at creek crossings. My feeling is that the less time I spend in the woods scouting, the less likely I’ll be to spook deer. Scouting by bike allows me to accomplish in electric hunting bicycles few hours what might take days to do on foot.

Hunter’s RX family scissor lifts feature best in class drive-on and raise height to reduce clearance issues. Hunter lift racks are built to minimize space while maximizing productivity in any auto shop. This auto service equipment is available in several fully-integrated options including approach ramp extensions, Inflation Station, swing air jacks, Hunter’s AlignLights System and much more.

Club racing this weekend – yeehah! KIDS CROSS COUNTRY RIDE DATE: Sunday 21st May, 2017. TIME: Registration 7:30 -8:30am. Ride to start at 9am. (Note that this is the same time as the main XC race, but it will be on a different course and will be run by a couple of the committee members – the help of any parents or other family members not racing would be appreciated). LOCATION: AWABA. RACE FORMAT: Set number of laps around the kids / development course. GRADES: This is aimed to provide a participation event for young children up to approximately 12 years of age who are not competent to race on the full track. COST: Junior Riders (14 Years and under) – Free. However, the child must be an MTBA member or purchase a day licence or sign up for the free trial licence**. HMBA CROSS COUNTRY RACE DATE: Sunday 21st May, 2017. TIME: Registration 7:30 -8:30am. Race to start at 9am. LOCATION: AWABA. RACE FORMAT: Set number of laps – to be advised Sunday morning once the track has been set. GRADES: Men: A, B, C and D grade and Juniors. Women: A, B, C and D COST: Senior Riders (over 18) – $15. Junior Riders (15 – 18 year old inclusive) – $10. Junior Riders (14 Years and under) – Free. + $25 Day Licence for Non MTBA Members ** VOLUNTEERS: If you can help out on the day with timekeeping, it would be most appreciated. DOWNHILL DATE: Sunday 21st May, 2017. TIME: Registration 8:45am to 10am. Shuttles Start 9:00am. Racing starts 12:00pm No Private Shuttles! LOCATION: AWABA: Track – Full Monkey COST: $35. MTBA Members (Please have Licence at sign on) + $25 Day Licence for Non MTBA Members ** VOLUNTEERS: If any Mum, Dad or friend is able to give us a hand with timing, driving shuttles etc, please see the guys at the sign on tent.

• Camo Accessory Bag – Holds gear and adds storage options. Conveniently fastens over the back wheel. Waterproof and durable construction stands up to the elements. Requires XL Luggage Rack for installation and proper use. Imported. Camo pattern: DZX™.

I have tried all manner of bikes in the woods and this fat bike is the best. It’s quiet, forgiving on rough terrain and its stable. Some might call fat bikes a fad or gimmick but I think they’re wrong. I moved to a Pugsley for hunting years ago from a hard tailed mountain bike because it was just plain more fun.

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Getting to remote stands usually requires entering into the woods well before daylight; getting out requires long walks in the dark. Neither scenario makes for a silent passage. Striking a compromise between a quiet approach and a quick advance can be difficult — which is exactly what a mountain bike can offer.

What a great morning of XC racing we had at Awaba today. We had 9 kids on the development track who were rewarded with cake pops made by Annie G, plus a pick from the lolly/chip bucket! This event was directed by Dallas. Thanks to all the parents who helped out. Lots of junior riders, as well as big numbers across all the grades had us all smiling. Also lots of first time racers, I hope you all feel very welcome. Thanks to Dean for setting a great course and to all the volunteers – our wonderful President, time keepers and first aid, who make it all possible. You are legends!