“three wheeled hunting scooter -tricycle with big tires”

The frame’s lowered top tube maximizes stand over clearance and rider comfort, making it easy to mount and dismount. The frame is engineered to ensure an efficient, responsive ride and stable handling, even at low speed.

It wasn’t long before I was using my bike for other hunting chores, like hanging tree stands. Of course, you’re not going to carry a ladder stand through the woods on a bike, but lock-on type stands and even some climbers are easy to strap to the rack. By using the front basket to carry a bag of screw-in tree steps, a safety harness and a haul line, and tasking the rear rack to carry the stand, hauling my entire set-up to even remote parts of my hunting property was a simple affair.

The CB4 frame has attachment points for 1, 2, or 3 standard water bottle cage mounts, depending on the space available on each frame size (larger frames have more bottle mounts, smaller ones have less). The fork has 2 mid-blade mounts and 2 sets of triple-boss attachment points, one on each leg, for oversize cages on the fork to expand carrying capacity for water, stove fuel, sleeping pads and other gear.

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I waited patiently as the doe worked its way closer, and when it got to within 20 yards, I placed my top pin just behind its shoulderblade and released my arrow. The broadhead found its mark, and a few minutes later, I was giving thanks for my first kill of the season.

Covering several hundred yards quickly is a simple affair for a hunter on a bike. Moreover, a bike seems to make less noise — or at least a less recognizable noise — than does someone walking; it certainly makes less noise that an ATV. Of course, if you’re riding in before dawn, you’ll want to have scouted the route before hand.

Then I saw tire tracks. Bicycle tire tracks. DAMN!! That’s what I need. I started thinking about all the deer, elk and moose I’ve seen riding trails in Idaho, about the way they often just stare at you when you ride up on them, or maybe just amble away. That might be just the thing for elk hunting, right?

Stephen Regenold is Founder and Editor-In-Chief of GearJunkie, which he launched as a nationally-syndicated newspaper column in 2002. As a journalist and writer, Regenold has covered the outdoors industry for nearly two decades, including as a correspondent for the New York Times. electric hunting bike equipment father of four small kids, Regenold and his wife live in Minneapolis.

Good hubs and tires will keep you moving, proper brakes will limit your run-ins with local flora. I like disc brakes, rather than calipers. They don’t take nearly the effort on steep downhills, adjust with a simple twist of a knob, don’t get hot and fade, and don’t make as much noise.

State lands are not gated but may not be well marked with signs. But they are open to the public so there’s no issue with hunting them. Timber company lands are usually easy to identify because most access points are gated, and these gates are painted different colors according to the company ownership. That fact isn’t too important because public access is usually permitted with limited regulation, such as no overnight camping, building fires, and the use of motorized vehicles behind the gates.  A key point to note – during the early bow seasons in Washington and Oregon wildfire potential increases and timber companies are quick to restrict all public access until adequate rains soak the forests.  Hefty fines are issued to those who don’t respect these restrictions.

As I thought about this location and several others I have hunted, I began to realize that most of the properties I hunt have a network of access roads that are used by the DNR, and sometimes by farmers who have agreements to plant crops on the property. On that 1.5-mile trek, more than a mile of it could easily be ridden on a bike.

As these fat tire bikes have showed up at hunting shows over the last year, I have viewed them more with curiosity than anything, but I as I considered how they might fit into my bowhunting, I am about to take the plunge. I bowhunt whitetails on public land in several states each year, and that often involves getting way back into a property to get away from the crowds. For example, I have found a location where I have killed a couple of mature bucks on public land in Kansas, but it’s a walk of more than 1.5 miles. That’s a long haul before daylight and after dark. Once I shoot a big buck back in there, the distance seems to become even longer.

I bought this go-kart for my daughters about a year and a half ago or maybe it was 2-1/2 years ago who knows. It sits in our garage and has barely been used. Its a constant source of headache and I wish I could go back in time and convince myself to NOT buy this go-kart. I HATE when my kids want to use it because just as the case today, I couldn’t get the thing to start. Ifread more…

An unpressured deer is a different animal: It moves around throughout the day, relaxed and casual in its movements. It strolls into open areas during daylight without even considering that it might need to look up into trees to check for humans.

Due to the high number of sales of our bikes to fellow sportsman just like yourself, our bikes are in high demand. Check out our All Terrain Electric Fat Bike listing page to see what’s in stock and what’s on the way. Hopefully we’ll be able to get you out and about and enjoying one of our electric fat bikes and you’ll be able to see for yourself why many of our customers consider this to be the best electric bike for hunting.

Managing Editor Sean McCoy is a life-long outdoorsman who grew up hunting and fishing central Wisconsin forests and lakes. He joined GearJunkie after a 10-year stint as a newspaperman in the Caribbean, where he learned sailing and wooden-boat repair. Based in Denver, McCoy is an avid trail runner, camper, hunter, angler, mountain biker, skier, and beer tester.

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